Tag Archive | Veterinarian

Canine health problems: What is bloating?

Bloat is a common health problem in deep-chested breed of dogs. The dilation of the stomach due to entrapment of the fluids/food/gas is typically called bloating in dogs. However if along with the entrapment there is also the rotation of the stomach on its long axis then the condition is called gastric-dilation volvulus which could even prove fatal to the dog. Let’s just say that bloat could be an early sign of volvulus. Therefore if you notice any of the following symptoms then immediately take your pet to the veterinarian.

Common signs of bloat/gastric-dilation volvulus are:

  • Unproductive bouts of retching
  • Trying to belch/vomit without producing anything
  • Dry mouth or excess salivating
  • Weakness/lethargy
  • Uneasiness while walking
  • Pale gums
  • High heartbeat rate
  • Shortness of breath
  • Cold body temperature
  • Extreme anxiety or depression
  • Stomach feels slightly tight
  • Hollow noise made on patting the abdomen

Apart from these common symptoms there could sometimes be no warning at all before your dog goes into hypertensive shock due to stomach rotation. Therefore if you suspect that your dog’s stomach is bloating then immediately take him to a veterinarian. Bloat or volvulus mostly occurs in deep chested dog breeds like Irish setters, German Shepherds, Great Dane, Akitas, Saint Bernards to name a few. However this problem could affect any dog.

Here are some common causes of bloat or gastric-dilation volvulus:

  • Vigorous exercise immediately before or after meal
  • Eating one large meal once daily/quickly eating lot of food
  • Drinking water immediately after eating dry dog food.
  • Eating meals from bowls kept on a raised platform etc.

Gastric dilation volvulus or bloat should not be taken lightly for they have a 50% chance of recurring and most of the time prove fatal for your beloved pooch. Also since the time it takes for the bloat to get worse is just a few hours. Therefore on slightest suspicion of bloat in your dog rush him immediately to a nearby veterinarian. Hope these tips will help you in providing excellent pet care. Remember a healthy dog is a happy dog. Good luck!

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What to do if your pet dog gets burned?

 

 

Though there is a lot of awareness about how to treat injuries like fractures or swelling as well as what to do when your dog gets diarrhea or vomits but not many people know how to handle dog burns. A common truth that every pet owner faces is that however careful you may be, sometimes accidents do happen. The majority of burn wounds in dogs occur in the home and are categorized as thermal (heat), chemical and electrical. We strongly advise you to take your dog to the vet immediately when burn accidents happen but in the meantime you should know these handy tips also:

  1. The least dangerous and easily treatable dog burns are superficial thermal burns which can be treated by immersion of the affected skin in cold water or by applying an ice pack. Then you should remove any hair or debris from the burn wound and gently pat dry. Do not use oil-based medications on a burn wound. Prefer medical creams which will help prevent infection and does not interfere with burn wound healing. Ask your vet to suggest such medicines to use just in case. A non-stick telfa pad can then be applied followed by a light bandage to hold it in place. If the burn wound becomes infected or is not healing, veterinary care is needed.
  2. A more serious burn is deep thermal burns which extend below the surface of the skin and require immediate veterinary care. You should place a cloth loosely over the burn area (Do not rinse with water or place any medications on the burn wound) and then head to a veterinarian immediately. Since these burn wounds are serious and very painful hence some dogs may even go into shock.
  3. Then there are Electrical burns which are usually the result of a dog biting into an electrical cord. These burns are seen on the lips and tongue (where the dog bit the cord) but the dog’s entire body received an electrical shock. If you see your dog bite an electrical cord, do not touch the dog or try to pull the cord from its mouth as you may get shocked. First pull the plug from the outlet before doing anything else. If your dog is unconscious then check for breathing and a heartbeat or pulse. If breathing or the heart has stopped you may need to perform CPR. Whenever your dog is a victim of any electrical burn or shock, even if he seems fine, seek immediate veterinary care.
  4. Lastly there are Chemical burns (acid or alkali compounds) which are most common as well. These may occur on the surface of the body or may be ingested. Rinsing the chemical off with water should be done as soon as possible. However, if you know the compound is an acid, you can rinse the area with baking soda dissolved in water. If the compound is alkaline, then vinegar and water may be used. If your dog ingested the compound, check the container to see if there is an antidote and seek veterinary care immediately.